×

Tag: remote working

From Colocation to Remote First

Changing how we work, to ensure we can still deliver.

One of the big tenants of agile working has always been about the importance of colocation, and there are a million blogs out there on why colocation makes a big difference.

The first value of the Agile Manifesto states: Individuals and Interactions Over Processes and Tools; and one of the 12 principles is to Enable face-to-face interactions; this is because it is generally understood that colocation allows a better ‘osmosis’ of knowledge between the team, allowing better and faster sharing of information and discussions.

A busy desk full of laptops, phones, drinks and pens etc.

But colocation has always had its downsides, the main ones being that constant colocation doesn’t’ allow people time to process information and work without interruption/ distraction. There’s also a large time and cost implication; with team members and especially Subject Matter Experts often having to travel a lot to remain engaged. The most common excuse I have heard from Senior Leaders in organisations on why they can’t attend user research sessions or show and tells etc. is the time and effort it takes not only to attend the event, but to travel to it as well.

As we get better at recognising that not everyone works in the same way; recognising the limits of colocation is also important.

For the last few years, most of the teams I’ve worked on or managed have used a mix of colocation and remote working; usually a minimum of 3 days (ideally 4) in the office working together and only one or two days working from home.

This allows the colocated days to be utilised best for design workshops, user research, sprint ceremonies etc. Days where we can make the most out of being face to face.

That means the ‘remote working’ days could be used to reflect, to review notes, ‘do work’. They were also the days that could be best used for meetings etc.

A laptop on a table at home, with a phone and notebook next to it
Working from home.

Obviously COVID-19 threw all of those ways of working on their head; with everything that could be done remotely, moving to be fully remote. Within Difrent in that time we have on-boarded new staff, stood up brand new teams, completed Discoveries, delivered critical services to help with the nations response to the pandemic etc. Now as we consider how we move to a world post pandemic is the time to pause and consider whether we need to (or even want to) return to old ways of working.

A conversation at the virtual #OneTeamGov breakfast meet last week highlighted that Lockdown has meant we have all had to find more inclusive ways of working. It used to be the case that people ‘in the office’ would often make most of the decisions, and then replay those decisions to us few remote workers. Nowadays, with no one in the office, it forces us all to think about who needs to be involved in conversations and decisions. It might take a bit more planning, but it allows us to be more considerate of people’s time and involvement.

An image of a zoom screen with lots of people in the meeting waving
#OneTeamGov Breakfast meet attendees

Within Difrent we have recognised that a return back to full colocation is actually not necessary in order for us to keep delivering services that matter. Working remotely has not impacted our ability to deliver at all. Rather than having remote working be the exception, we are now planning how we can make that the norm.

Thinking about how we put people before processes; we are ensuring we use the days where we will all get together face to face to their best advantage, making sure we get value from peoples time and the effort they have put in to travel and that we are adding value to them (and the project) in return.

The people getting left behind

Why ‘in the era of remote working we need to stop thinking about ‘digital services’ as a separate thing, and just think about ‘services’.

Last night when chatting to @RachelleMoose about whether digital is a privilege, which she’s blogged about here, it made me remember a conversation from a few weeks ago with @JanetHughes about the work DEFRA were doing, and their remit as part of the response to the current pandemic (which it turns out is not just the obvious things like food and water supplies, but also what do we do about Zoo’s and Aquariums during a lockdown?!)

A giraffe

This in turn got me thinking about the consequences of lockdown that we might never have really have considered before the COVID 19 pandemic hit; and the impact a lack of digital access has on peoples ability to access public services.

There are many critical services we offer everyday that are vital to peoples lives that we never imagined previously as ‘digital’ services which are now being forced to rely on digital as a means of delivery, and not only are those services themselves struggling to adapt but we are also at risk of forgetting those people for whom digital isn’t an easy option.

All ‘digital’ services have to prove they have considered Digital Inclusion, back in 2014 it was found approx. 20% of Britains had basic digital literacy skills, and the Digital Literacy Strategy aimed to have everyone who could be digital literate, digitally able by 2020. However it was believed that 10% of the population would never be able to get online, and the Assisted Digital paper published in 2013 set out how government would enable equal access to users to ensure digital excluded people were still able to access services. A report by the ONS last year backs this assumption up, showing that in 2019 10% of the population were still digital excluded.

However, as the effects of lockdown begin to be considered, we need to think about whether our assisted digital support goes far enough; and whether we are really approaching how we develop public services holistically, how we ensure they are future proof and whether we are truly including everyone.

There have been lots of really interesting articles and blogs about the impact of digital (or the lack of access to digital) on children’s education. With bodies like Ofsted expressing concerns that the lockdown will widen the gap education between children from disadvantaged backgrounds and children from more affluent homes; with only 5% of the children classified as ‘in need’ who were expected to still be attending school turning up.

An empty school room

According to the IPPR, around a million children do not have access to a device suitable for online lessons; the DfE came out last month to say there were offering free laptops and routers to families in need; however a recent survey showed that while over a quarter of teachers in private schools were having daily interaction with their pupils online less than 5% of those in state schools were interacting with their pupils daily online. One Academy chain in the North West is still having to print home learning packs and arrange for families to physically pick up and drop off school work.

The Good Things Foundation has shared its concerns similarly about the isolating effects of lockdown, and the digital divide that is being created, not just for families with children, but for people with disabilities, elderly or vulnerable people or households in poverty. Almost 2 million homes have no internet access, and 26 million rely on pay as you go data to get online. There has been a lot of concern raised about people in homes with domestic violence who have no access to phones or the internet to get help. Many companies are doing what they can to try and help vulnerable people stay connected or receive support but it has highlighted that our current approach to designing services is possibly not as fit for the future as we thought.

The current pandemic has highlighted the vital importance for those of us working in or with the public sector to understand users and their needs, but to also ensure everyone can access services. The Digital Service Standards were designed with ‘digital’ services in mind, and it was never considered 6 months ago, that children’s education, or people’s health care needed to be considered and assessed against those same standards.

The standards themselves say that the criteria for assessing products or services is applicable if either of the following apply:

  • getting assessed is a condition of your Cabinet Office spend approval
  • it’s a transactional service that’s new or being rebuilt – your spend approval will say whether what you’re doing counts as a rebuild

The key phrase here for me is ‘transactional service’ ie. the service allows:

  • an exchange of information, money, permission, goods or services
  • submitting of personal information that results in a change to a government record

While we may never have considered education as a transactional service before now, as we consider ‘the new normal’ we as service designers and leaders in the transformation space need to consider which of our key services are transactional, how we are providing a joined up experience across all channels; and what holistic service design really means. We need to move away from thinking about ‘digital and non digital services’ and can no longer ‘wait’ to assess new services, instead we need to step back and consider how we can offer ANY critical service remotely going forward should we need to do so.

A child using a tablet

Digital can no longer be the thing that defines those with privilege, COVID 19 has proved that now more than ever it is an everyday essential, and we must adapt our policies and approach to service design to reflect that. As such, I think it’s time that we reassess whether the Digital Service Standards should be applied to more services than they currently are; which services we consider to be ‘digital’ and whether that should even be a differentiator anymore. In a world where all services need to be able to operate remotely, we need to approach how we offer our services differently if we don’t want to keep leaving people behind.

Matt Knight has also recently blogged on the same subject, so linking to his blog here as it is spot on!

Where is this meeting anyway?

Gone are the days of wandering round a building trying to find the meeting room your next meeting is meant to be in. Now a days, in the new world of working from home and virtual meetings I seem to be wandering round the internet trying to find my next virtual meeting host.

One minute I’m in zoom, the next it’s over to Chime, then it’s Skype, hangouts or Teams.

I’ve had to download a load of new software/ sign up for new accounts etc; and have already (just the once thankfully) gotten lost and sat in the wrong virtual meeting space wondering why no-one else has turned up.

The art of remote working isn’t new to me (in the old world I worked at home 2-3 days a week anyway) but as everyone moves to this new way of working; I’ve gained a lot more meetings and workshops; and skipping between meeting spaces is a new challenge, and one I suspect i’m not alone in facing.

A virtual meeting!

So here are some top tips I’ve learnt so far:

  • Make sure meetings are 45 mins out of an hour; this leaves people 15 mins between meetings to stand up, move around, get a cuppa etc, before they load up their next meeting.
  • Make sure the meeting location is highlighted in the location, and again in the meeting text. I’ve spotted in a few meeting invites (possibly because we use G-suite) that hangouts seems to be in there, even when the meeting is actually on Zoom etc.
  • Check when setting up a meeting that everyone can access that meeting space (I can’t access Skype as we don’t use Microsoft) and ensure you’re highlighting the dial in option for those that need it.
  • As individuals taking ownership of our calendars and blocking out time when we are free for calls, or need to do something else* and aren’t available for meetings, to ensure we are not constantly running from one meeting to another with no time to ‘do stuff’
  • And as meeting organisers we should enable and encourage people to dip out of meetings when they get a phone call they have to take or need to do something else*, and come back when they can!
  • Don’t be afraid to recognise when you aren’t adding value to a meeting, or when you can add more value elsewhere and allow yourself to leave meetings you don’t have to be in; and as meeting organisers we should be calling our and encouraging people to do just that.

*Especially with more people having children at home, or others in the house also working from home.

The main takeaway for me is that it’s much easier when working from home to just sit at your desk all day; as I no longer have the onus on me to walk to my next meeting; or pop over to a colleagues desk for a chat; so I need the time between meetings to move around and stretch if nothing else. Secondly I’m more likely to leave a virtual meeting open even when I have other work to do and I can’t give it my full attention, as it’s just another screen; whereas before I was much better at being careful and prioritising my time when I had to be in the room physically; a bad habit and one I ( and others) need to make sure we’re not falling afoul of.

The world is changing and we need to change our working habits to stay healthy and productive. We can’t just make everything virtual, we need to adapt our working practices to make virtual work for us. Who knows if, or when, we will ever return to our old meeting rooms!

An empty meeting room