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Measuring cost vs. measuring value?

Discussing the differences between Product Management in the Private and Public sector.

There has always been a perceived difference in how Product Managers in the public and private sector work, what their priorities are and their key focuses.

Historically at its most simplistic the view has been that within the Public sector the Product Manager focuses on what user’s need. Whereas Product Managers in the private sector focus on what users want.

Interestingly as more organisations in the Private Sector adopt the user centric design principles championed by Government Digital services and public sector organisations the difference in the role between the Private and public sectors decreases. Within the public sector we do indeed focus on user’s needs, however we do have to consider their wants as well if we want to create services our users will enjoy using.

Equally while Product Managers in the Private Sector will focus more on want’s, as that is where their revenue is likely to be, and what will give them the edge in the market. But they will also consider need’s, because when developing a service for users, it’s important to understand whether users wants and needs are polar opposites to ensure your not setting your scope too small or your costs too high. As such, while this difference between need and want is possibly still the best way to separate the roles, they are not as different as they once were.

A simple task backlog

No matter what sector they work in, be that private sector or Public, Product Managers are still there to ‘represent’ the end user and their needs/wants, within the Public sector the Product Manager is more likely to work with a user researcher who will help them understand those needs, and there will be more of a focus on user research to ensure the users are properly understood and represented, but at their core the Product Manager is still there to ensure those needs are met in the best possible way.

They are also responsible for understanding the opportunities and gaps within the market place, looking for opportunities to fill a need that is missing; for developing their Product strategy and roadmap and setting the scope for their Product to meet the needs or target the gaps they have identified.

So, perhaps the other key difference between the Private and Public sector Product Managers, is cost revenue. Within the Private Sector, the Product Manager is responsible for ensuring the Product or Service they are developing will fit within the Business Model, they manage the profit and loss for their Products, and the development of the business development strategy. They will quantify the return on investment predominantly through revenue return. They will be examining the market place to understand what similar products are out there, and their costs to users to use; Once they have a rough idea on how much they can make they can determine their ROI is based on how much it will cost to develop vs. how much profit are they likely to make from users once the Product or service is live.

Within the Public sector there is not the same onus on cost revenue. Departments are funded by the treasury, very few agencies or bodies generate their own revenue, and while there are some, they are not looking to create a profit in the same way the private sector is.

Instead the return on investment we are considering in the Public sector is about value to the public purse. Is there value in spending public money on developing this product or service? We do this by examining how much is currently spent on running any existing services; how much is ‘lost’ through waste or inefficiencies; how much can be saved by introducing service improvements or a new service for users and how much will it likely cost to develop? If the savings out way the spend, then there is likely value in us using public money to develop this.

A dashboard showing user numbers

This approach to determining value is the difference between the public and private sector product managers, but also shows how similar the roles actually are. Product Managers, no matter what sector they are in, care about their users and developing products and services for them. They look to the market to understand opportunities; they work to develop their Product strategy and to quantify the available Return on Investment.

I think we need to put to bed this idea that the Private sector solely puts revenue over users, and that the Public sector doesn’t care about costs.  Both Private sector and Public sector Product Managers have a lot they can learn from each other, and we should be looking for more opportunities to join up and share our experiences and knowledge.

I believe both Private sector and Public sector Product Managers have a lot they can learn from each other, and we should be looking for more opportunities to join up and share our experiences and knowledge. I think we need to put to bed this idea that the Private sector solely puts revenue over users, and that the Public sector doesn’t care about costs.

When is Digital not Digital?

When it’s not about user needs or human centric design, but instead about fixing technological infrastructure.

When it’s not about transforming the service but keeping the lights on systems.

When it’s not about asking “why?”, because you already know the solution you want.

A sign asking “Why?”

As Tom Loosemore said, Digital is applying the culture, practices, processes & technologies of the Internet-era to respond to people’s raised expectations.

There are lots of conversations online about being digital, not doing digital. Digital is not a process, it is a cultural mind-set.

It is a way of asking questions and prioritising needs. It’s about delivering value and designing services that meet user needs and expectations.

A person using a smart phone.

Now and then you can still see organisations that use Digital as a label when they mean technology or IT.

However, those things are not interchangeable. The culture and mindset of of the teams of the teams, and the organisations itself, is very different.

In organisations that use digital as a label but are not embracing what it means to be digital you will still see a separation between change or transformation and digital. They will still have siloed ways of working.

The business will still separate the programme funding, governance and strategy from the digital teams tasked with delivery.

Organisations where digital is a way of working, not just a label, you will see properly empowered teams made up of people from across the business. You will have teams who ‘own’ the holistic service they are delivering from strategy to delivery.

Open plan digital office space

These are organisations where the multidisciplinary team isn’t just something that digital ‘do’ but the whole organisations embraces.

This comparison between Digital and Technology is equally relevant when considering the role of the Chief Digital Officer vs. a Chief Technology Officer or Chief Information Officer. There’s a good discussion of the various roles here. As with the other roles the Chief Digital Officer looks after an organisations data and technology assets. However, they go one step further and have a wider eye, considering the strategy and the possibilities for innovation and wider transformation. Their focus is not on keeping the lights on, but understanding why the lights are needed and are there any other options?

Servers

For me this sums up why digital is wider ands more far reaching than Technology, and why the Digital mind-set and culture is so important to get right for organisations trying to deliver transformation. And why, if you don’t have these things right, if you are digital in name but not culture, you are going to struggle to deliver real transformation.

Building a case based on assumptions

Why you shouldn’t start with the business case.

I’ve been working within Digital transformation for almost ten years now, working on some of the largest projects and programmes within the public sector. From front line services to backend systems, from simple forms to complex benefit processing applications.

One thing that has been a feature of every product or service I’ve been a part of has been the business case. Over the years I’ve worked to challenge and transform the business case itself, making it more agile and less cumbersome, in multiple organisations.

Traditionally business cases have been built on the preconception that you know exactly what solution you want, with the costs and timings estimated accordingly. These behemoth business cases usually clock in over 25 pages long, with very little room of flexibly or change. The millstones in them are clearly laid out and everyone sits around clapping themselves on the back for delivering the business case, and then wondering why the Product itself never gets delivered.

A laptop with a document on next to a notebook and smartphone

In the last decade as the more agile methodologies and user centric ways of working have spread the traditional business case, and the role of those individuals who are focused on their development, has struggled to keep pace with the changes happening within the projects and programmes themselves.

The traditional method of drafting business cases that map out your road map and spend in full are now antiquated, and holding back teams from delivering. New business cases need to instead focus on agreeing design principles and the problem the business is trying to fix rather than bottoming out the minutiae of the roadmap. On explaining the assumptions that have helped define the scope of the Product or programme, which can be backed up by evidence , this is worth more than a cost estimate hammered down to the pounds and pence.

Before doing Product evaluations it is vitally important to ensure all senior stakeholders agree on the assumptions the team is working too (regarding the scope, business needs, user needs etc.) And these are the things new business cases should be focused on, not jumping straight to a solution based on product comparisons that have been carried out before everyone has agreed what is in scope.

One anecdote in particular has always stuck with me, in terms of why it’s important to agree your scope, before you start comparing products.

A few years ago, back when I was working with the Office of the Public Guardian on their CRM replacement, the team at the time did some research and analysis into the best options for the business and whether they should be looking to build, buy or configure a new system.

As the business wanted to be a digital be default exemplar, there was an early assumption that the new system would only need to ingest data received via digital channels, or call data for the minimal cases that couldn’t be dealt with digitally. This led to some early product comparisons being done, into Products that would meet the business’ requirements.

However, some research and conversations with legal SMEs during the Discover period highlighted that, as the OPG had responsibilities as a safeguarding body, they needed to be able to accept and analyse data received via any source. Which meant they actually needed a system that could ingest and understand faxed data, call data, digital data and handwritten data. The ability to ingest and assign meta data to handwritten data meant some products that had actually been in consideration now had to be ruled out.

Thankfully the business case for the CRM system had been developed with enough flexibility and empowerment and trust within the programme team, that this did not dramatically slow down or derail the team in terms of delivery as they were still working within the agreed scope and cost envelope, but the Product Comparisons had to be reconsidered and the scope and cost estimates changed accordingly.

While this was a relatively small example, it highlights the importance of validating scope assumptions before pinning down your business case.

Many organisations embracing Digital and agile ways of working have struggled with how they can fit the need for traditional governance structures, and especially the business case, into the culture and ways of working that Digital brings with it. My honest opinion is that you can’t.   

Instead, there has been a movement in some areas, led by the likes of GDS and MoJ which I have been apart of and leading conversations along with others on for some years, to change the role and format of the Business case. To encourage the business case itself to be developed and iterated alongside the Product and Programme it supports. This approach to iterate the business case alongside the agile Project lifecycle was first laid out by GDS back in 2014 for digital transformation programmes. The Institute for Government did a report back in October 2018 on how business cases were used, and what could be improved to enable better delivery.

Rather than a business case written almost in isolation by a Programme Manager before going round and round for comments, there is value in treating your business case like any other output from the a multidisciplinary team.  

A blank notebook next to a laptop

Instead of a 25+ page tome that aims to spell everything out upfront, before the project even commences properly, there is much more value in simply having a couple of pages explaining the problem the project is seeking to fix and why, along with estimated timing and costs for some exploratory work to define key assumptions and answer key questions (like what happens if we don’t fix this? How many people will it effect? Are there any legal requirements we need to be aware of?) that will help your project start on the right foot.

Once you can answer those questions, then you can iterate the business case; taking a stab at estimating how you think you might going about fixing the problem(s), how long it will take to fix the important key problem(s) you identified need fixing first, are there any products out there in the market that could do this for you? How much might this roughly cost?

You can then iterate the business case again once you’ve started developing the Product or implementing the identified solution. Once you have validated the assumptions you’ve made previously about the solution to the problem you’re fixing.

This means the business case is a living document, kept up to date with the costs and timetable you’re working to. It means your board are able to much more accurately assuage their accountabilities, ensuring costs are being spent in line with the scope of the programme or project.

Empty chairs around a table

Whatever methodology you are using, the importance of being able to explain why you are doing something, and what the problem you are trying to fix is, before leaping into what software product is the solution to buy and how much it’ll cost you. If it’s done right, the business case helps you evidence you are doing the right thing and spending money in the right way.

#GovermentIsOpen

Why we need to bring user centric design into our Communications in the public Sector.

Having been involved in the hiring of many Content and Interaction Designers in the last few years, we’ve always preferred candidates from within the Public Sector, because they tend to have the same specialisms as we in the Digital Data and Technology (DDaT) Profession have, looking down our nose a little at applicants from the private sector who seem to be a bit of a ‘jack of all trades of design’ doing some social media, some UX and some content design.

A Neon sign showing 0 likes.

We want people who understand user centric design, who design services based on user needs. We want content designers used to working in multidisciplinary teams designing and developing services. We want Content Designers who are used to designing what ‘we’ class as Content, which having spoken to people interested in applying for our roles seems to be quite often different, or at least a narrower definition, to what the wider industry classes as Content. A search for content design jobs online shows the breadth of jobs that can fall under that category.

But in the last year or so I’ve begun to look at those we have left behind with this approach, those we have excluded and where this has left us, especially in terms of both recruitement, and our engagement with our users.

The Government Design community is constantly growing and expanding. With the salaries being offered quickly outsripping the number of candidates we have available. We are all constantly stealing candidates from each other, and those departments and agencies that can’t afford to pay that much, are left relaying on contractors because we can’t hire people.

Digital is seen as a channel for contact, and within the public sector we are moving our products and services online. However, social media is generally not considered as part of that transformation. It is not a transactional service, and therefor generally not considered within the remit of the Digital design teams. The content we put out on social media is seen as the same as we put out to the press, it is a tool for giving out information, as such the people on our social media teams tend to be comms professionals, or people with a background in journalism or marketting.

People looking at their phones

Interestingly Social Media teams are not generally included within the Government design community, and until a conversation 18 months ago with Joanne Rewcastle at DWP Digital I’d never really thought about that. The DDaT roles are based around the roles first needed by Gov.uk and expanded on from there as part of the work by GDS. As such these are the roles needed to design and develop transactional services. Which makes sense.

However, it means we are not thinking about what our users need from our social media. We are not designing the content we put on social media in the same way as the content we put on our digital services, or even our websites.

Also, it means when it comes to recruitment, we are not looking preferably on those people who have a social media or wider comms background as they are not, by the DDaT definition, Content Designers, and unfortunately it is currently quite hard for people working in Social media or wider comms to move over into the Content Design space as they tend to not have the experience of working in multidisciplinary teams or on transactional user needs driven services we are looking for.

With our digital services we have to ensure they are accessible. Our content designers and interaction designers are experts in making sure our content is accessible and understandable by everyone. But in my experience we haven’t been making sure our social media teams are experts in that as well.

A keyboard with an accessibility symbol

It was from Content Design and Accessibility expert colleagues I learned the rule of #CapatalisingYourHashTags so that they can be better understood by accessibility software. The same goes for images and emojis, are we all making sure we’re using them in such a way that screen readers and accessibility software can understand them? If our users are using social media, if that is a service we offer, then do we not have the same responsibility to make sure that service is as usable and accessible as any other service we offer? Even if it isn’t ‘transactional’.

Our Social media colleagues are generally great in helping us think about how to design messages in ways to engage the audiences on different channels, they understand the demographics of the users on the different platforms and what messages work best with which users where. They often have a wealth of data and evidence regarding our users that could benefit Product Development teams. When we’re considering as Product teams how to engage our users it seems to me that is a great time to engage with our social media colleagues. Equally, Product teams, through user research sessions and user needs analysis collect a lot of evidence and data teams that could benefit our Social Media colleagues. Unfortunately I’ve seen very few places pulling those skills together well.

Full credit to DWP Digital’s social media team here, where the team reached out and joined up with the content design community even though they were not officially part of it according to the DDaT professions, to ensure they were considering user needs in how they used social media. That team worked incredibly hard to build people’s awareness of how to use social media, to ensure content was accessible and usable.

A mix of laptops and smartphones on a desk

A few other Departments have done simillar, and I think that is a good thing. But I also think we need to look again at social media across the public sector. It’s not just a marketing tool anymore, In the age of the internet a good social media presence can make or break a company. Nothing is ever really gone from the internet, and that tweet or Facebook post from 5 years ago can come back to bite you on the bum.

So why are more places not using the principles of user design in our social media, or recognising the hard work of those people who are pushing for accessibility and user design in social media as much as those who are designing good content for a website or transactional service?

We need to recognise that the people within our Social Media teams and our Content Design teams have more in common than not, and that when we are recruiting we can gain a lot from people who come form both sides of that bridge.

Being a visible leader with an invisible disability.

Hi, I’m Zoe and I’m a NeuroDiverse Senior Civil Servant.

This is me! (Photo curtesy of @RachelleMoose)

Last week I attended Civil Service Live, it was an interesting day, with sessions on everything from AI and keeping abreast of new technologies, to Transformation to resilience and personal wellbeing. The session that stood out most for me was the “Making Government an event greater place to work” which was an interesting session featuring several people talking about their own mental health, and colleagues from DWP’s Diversity and Inclusion Team talking about the work they have been doing to make invisible disabilities more visible.

The team has been working with neurodiverse colleagues to make short videos to help neurotypical colleagues understand their disabilities. This included a video on sensory processing disorder, and how many colleagues with ASD can find what some people might call normal background noise overwhelming; and another video on how some people with Dyslexia can struggle with reading, with text moving around the page.

Exmaple of how someone with Dyslexia can perceive text

I thought these were really useful tools for colleagues to help increase understanding, and to normalise invisible disabilities.

After the session I got talking to one of the speakers and a few other attendees about some of the mentoring and leadership schemes that exist for Disabled people, and that unfortunately these are not widely visible with a lot of people not knowing they exist or how to join them. We also discussed the need for more visible representation of neurodiverse people within senior leadership.

I was diagnosed with Dyspraxia when I was 14, and nowadays I’ve recognised (through parenting my child through the intricate diagnosis process for ASD and ADHD) that I probably have ADHD as well and am now in conversations with my GP to get a referral for an assessment.

Writing ADHD on a blackboard.

When I first joined the Civil Service (technically as a temp back in 2002 before I went to university) I was doing a data entry job, and when I admitted to a senior manager that I had Dypraxia he told me to keep it quiet or everyone would wonder why he’d hired me. Having a learning disability was definitely seen as a barrier to progression.

I remember when I joined the Ministry of Defence as a Fast Streamer back in 2006, I looked at the data for the Senior Civil Service at the time and realised that less than 3% of colleagues in the SCS had a disability, and of those, the number who were declaring a non-physical disability was in single figures (in the MoD at least). At that time, I made the decision that I would do everything I could to reach the SCS, so I could help change those stats.

Until a few years ago I’d never met an SCS person who I knew was neurodiverse. I was talking to a senior leader asking for advice on speaking at conferences as it was something I’ve always struggled with in terms of confidence, and he admitted that he was Dyslexic and couldn’t read of prompts, so would always have to learn his presentations by heart. This was someone I had known for over a year, and it felt like I was being told a secret that they were ashamed of, but it made me feel hope. Here was this person 2 grades above me, who also had a learning disability. It was possible.

Several years ago at a leadership development session designed to help G6 colleagues pass the SCS application tests, one of the senior colleagues stated that “anyone can just learn to do maths with a little bit practice”. I ended up speaking up and saying that “as someone with a learning disability I found that kind of sweeping statement very unhelpful”. After the session I had another colleague approach me and ask if I could provide some mentoring to one of their members of staff who had Dyslexia and wanted to progress in their career but they weren’t sure if that was possible given their disability, and my colleague believed that talking to another neurodiverse person might help their confidence.

Over the years I’ve mentored perhaps a dozen people, some through official schemes, but just as many have approached me and asked whether I would mentor them as they themselves are neurodiverse and there aren’t that many senior leaders out there who own up publicly to having a learning disability or being neurodiverse. As such people feel that there aren’t people in senior leadership positions who have learning disabilities or are not neurotypical.

Within the Civil Service and wider public sector we are doing more now to normalise Disability, there are great leadership and development schemes like the Possetive Action Pathway out there now to help build capability for Disabled colleagues or recruit more neurodiverse people. DWP and HMRC have been running Autism work placement programmes, GCHQ has it’s “Positive About Disabled People” scheme and there’s the Summer Diversity Internship programme; Diversity and Inclusion networks across the Civil Service are working to help support Disabled colleagues, and schemes like the ‘Workplace Adjustment passport’ are a great tool for disabled colleagues and their managers.

A picture of a ‘noise -o-meter sometimes used to help people with Sensory Processing Disorder indicate how they are perceiving the sound around them.

But I still believe we need more visible neurodiverse senior leaders, and leaders with both visible and invisible disabilities. Figures from 2018 show that still only 5.4% of SCS colleagues have a disability. I couldn’t find any data on the percentage of those colleagues whose disability was visible, invisible or both, but it’s safe to say we need to normalise neurodiversity at all levels.

For those of us who are neurodiverse in the Senior Civil Service, we need to speak up and say to our colleagues that we are here. It is possible. We bring something to the table, and so do you.

Delivering Digital Government 2019

This week Claire Harrison (Head of Architecture from CQC) and I had the opportunity to attend the Delivering Digital Goverment event run by Worth Systems in The Hague.

The event was focused on how digital has transformed governments across the world, sharing best practices and lessons learned. With speakers from the founding of GDS, like Lord Maude, as well as speakers from the Netherlands, and it was a great opportunity to meet others working on solving problems for users in the Government space wider than the UK.

A lot of the talks, especially by the GDS alum were things I had heard before, but I actually found that reassuring, that over 5 years later I am still doing the right things, and approaching problems in the right way.

It was especially interesting to hear from both Lord Maude, and others, about the work they have been doing with foreign governments, for example in Canada, Peru and Hawaii. The map Andrew Greenway, previous of GDS now from Public Digital, shared of the digital government movement was fantastic to see, and really made me realise how big what we are trying to achieve around the world really is.

@ad_greenway sharing a map of the Digtial Government transformations happening around the world

The talks from some of the Dutch speakers were really interesting. I loved hearing about the approach the council in The Hague are taking to digital innovations, and their soon to be published digital strategy. One of the pilots the city are running in particular intrigued me; in an effort to reduce traffic, they put sensors onto parking spaces in key shopping streets and all disabled parking bays in the city. This gave them real time information on the use of the parking spaces, and where available spaces were and successfully decreased traffic from people driving around searching for spaces. They were now looking at how to scale the pilot an manage the infrastructure and senor data for a ‘smart’ city, working with local business to enable new services to be offered.

The draft digital strategy for the city of The Hague

We also heard about the work the Netherlands has been doing to pilot other innovative digital services, like a new service that allows residents in an area to submit planning ideas to improve their neighbourhoods, with the first trial receiving over 50 suggestions, of those 4 have been chosen to take forward. We heard about the support that was given to enable everyone to take part, and it was nice to hear about the 78 year old resident who’s suggestion came 5th.

It was also great to hear from the speaker from Matthij from Novum, a digital innovation lab in the Netherlands, who talked about his own personal journey into Digital transformation, learning from failures and ensuring that you prepare for failure from the start. He also told us about some fascinating research they have been doing into the use of smart speakers, especially with the elderly, to enable better engagement and use of government services to those that need assistive technologies.

An image of an older lady talking to an AI robot, courtesy of Novum

Realising that 30% of eligible claimants for the Dutch state pension supplement were not claiming it, they believed that this was potentially down to the complexity of the form. They hypothesised that smart speakers might be one way to solve this problem. However recognising that it was no good to make assumptions and design a solution for users without ensuring they had understood the problem their users were facing properly they did a small sample test with elderly users to see whether they could use smart speakers to check the date of their next pension payment (one of the largest contributors to inbound calls to the Sociale Verzekeringsbank), they found that not only could elderly users use the smart speakers, but that the introduction of smart speakers into their homes decreased loneliness dramatically.

There were other good sessions with James Stewart from GDS & Public Digtial on technology within digital, and an interesting panel session at the end. Every session was good, and I learnt something I heard something new at each one. My only grumble from the day was the lack of diversity in the speakers. Which the organises themselves put their hands up and admitted before they were called out on it. A quick call on twitter and the ever amazing Joanne Rewcaslte from DWP shared a list of amazing female speakers, so hopefully that will help with the next event.

One key thing I took away from the day is that the challenges are the same everyone, but the message is also the same, involve users from the start. In the practical steps everyone could start tomorrow, Matthij talked about ensuring you interview 5 end users, and some steps to simple prototypes you could develop to engage your users.

This slide from Lord Maude summed up three of the main things any organisations needs to succeed in delivering Digital Transformation

Lord Maude talked about the importance of a strong mandate, Novum talked about having a good understanding of the problem you are trying to fix at the start. The digital strategy from the Hague highlights the fact they want everyone to be able to participate and deliver a personal service to their citizens. As Andrew Greenaway said, they key thing is to “start with user needs”.

The other second key message from the day was that, as Lord Maude put it… “Just Do it!” A digital strategy delivers nothing, the strategy should be delivery, instead of spending months on developing a digital strategy, “you just have to start” by doing something, this in turn will help you develop your strategy once you understand the problems you are trying to solve, the people you will need, and the set up and way of doing things that works best in your organisation. This was a message reinforced by every speaker throughout the day.

@jystewart sharing a statement from Ivana Osores from Interbank… “You have to just start”

The third key message was the importance of good leadership, good teams and good people. Talk in the open about the failures you’ve made and what you have learned. Build strong multidisciplinary and diverse teams. As Andrew Greenway said, Start with teams, not apps or documents. In the round table discussion on building capability we spent a lot of time discussing the best ways to build capability, and the fact that in order to get good people and be able to keep them, and to go on to develop good things, you need strong leadership that is bought in to the culture you need to deliver.

I left the day with a number of good contacts, had some great conversations, and felt reinvigorated and reassured. Speaking to Worth I know they are aiming to run another event next year, with both an even more diverse international cohort and an equal number of female speakers, and I for one will definitely be signing up again for the next event.

Lord Maude, myself and Claire Harrison at the social gathering after the event

WomenInDigi19

How we as leaders can keep supporting people

Women In Digital Logo

As I sat listening to the conversations happening at the Women in Digital event on Wednesday, it occurred to me that although the point of the day was around creating more opportunities and continuing to support women working within digital, so many of the things that we talked about are also applicable outside of the digital industry.

Creating opportunities

One of the main points of discussion was how we can create opportunities. Opportunities through recruitment, promotion, to step up or work in new areas, to train and learn new skills, chances to take part in development programmes, attend conferences or speak at events. Opportunities for mentoring, to be a mentor or even just to job shadow someone. Those opportunities can come in all shapes and sizes and one of our roles as leaders is to make sure we’re creating those opportunities for people.

At the start of the event @Aaronjaffery mentioned that within the last year, DWP Digital has recruited for 9 new Senior Civil Service roles. For those they had almost 300 applications from men, but only 60 applications from women. However, of those 9 roles, 6 were filled by women who had applied and only 3 went to male candidates. This shows that the opportunities are out there but we need to work on encouraging women to apply for opportunities when they do arise. So what else needs to be done?

The right culture

We need to create the right kind of culture: the kind of culture that allows you to ask for help, to challenge things that you think aren’t working right, to admit that you’re not doing ok and need more support. The kind of culture that encourages people to check in with each other. @CheryJStevens did a fantastic keynote speech about her return to work journey a few years ago, the help and support she needed and the practical steps she took to successfully reintegrate into the workplace. As she so perfectly said: “It’s ok to not be ok, and to ask for help.” This message from a senior leader is really important and something we need to hear and talk about more.

Photo of Cheryl Stevens speaking at the event

Paying it forward

No one gets where they are without help and support, so it’s important to create an environment where you can pay that forward. For leaders to make themselves more available, offer coaching and support – creating those opportunities. It’s been nice to hear what organisations have been doing to create opportunities and the right culture for women to thrive in digital. It was great to hear from @ReneeNo17, Director of Digital Platforms at Sky, about their Returners Programme aimed at helping women return to work after career breaks, and the work they’re doing to increase diversity and be more inclusive. I know things like Digital Voices and Crossing Thresholds exist in the public sector to help women develop their skills, but we need more of this.

Building confidence

Whether it’s following a promotion, helping someone progress in their career or supporting someone returning to work, one of the key themes of the day was around people who have had their confidence knocked and needed to rebuild their faith in themselves. Running sessions that bust myths about who makes a good programmer and what skills they need was a good start. Following that up with opportunities to learn the basics of code in work was even better. It was great to see @SarahInTalent at the event, taking about @WILD_igital, a community in Leeds that was set up to grow and retain women in digital roles in the city. Schemes like Digital Voices where women can support each other to learn new skills and take up new opportunities are a great example of how DWP Digital is helping build skills, but all the women today cited how, most importantly, it has helped them build their confidence.

Online resources to help people learn to code

Support networks

One of the reasons I love coming to events like Women in Digital is because they’re all about building support networks, and I think they are so critical to all of us. Good networks give you all of the things I’ve talked about here. They can support you, build your confidence and encourage you. They can help you access new opportunities.

The other positive about networks is you can belong to many – none of us only wear one label. Intersectionality is important when considering things like how we get more women in digital, as we don’t want to only get more white women, or straight women, or women who went to Oxford University. It was great today to hear from lots of different women about their journey, and it’s always good to be able to hear about and consider perceptions and experiences different to our own. I want to keep widening that circle. Our networks can work together to build each other up.

@YanYanMurray and @Zoe_On_the_Go at the event

For me, days like today let me check in with my ‘tribe’. Even when we’ve all been busy, events like this are an opportunity to set aside time to focus on yourself and your development and see what is happening in the wider world, to consider that wider bubble, to challenge your assumptions and keep adding to your network; and that is really important. We gain skills and develop ourselves the more we work together to share our knowledge and experiences.

Be Brave and Believe in yourself

A guest blog written for @DWPDigital originally posted here.  

Why am I going to be flying my Pride flag extra high this Pride Month

Looking round the news over the last 12 months and you could be mistaken for thinking in some places we’re back in the 80’s if not earlier.

This week has brought news of Nazi’s attending Pride marches in America, Russia has been rolling back LGBTQ* rights for over a year now. In the UK there have been protests and debates about the inclusion of LGBTQ* relationships within Primary School education. There are still multiple places in the world where it’s not safe for LGBTQ* individuals to live or travel, never mind be able to marry or adopt.

With Japan ruling that Trans people must be sterilized, Brunei introducing the death penalty for homosexuality (but saying it won’t enforce it after a public outcry), America re-banning Trans in the military and the hot topic of Trans peoples place in sports and bathrooms it has felt very much like our Trans friends and family especially have been bearing the brunt of a lot of unwanted attention.

Trans Flag

I know there are many people, both in this country, and all over the world who can not be out. Who have to hide a part of themselves and remain in the closet. Pride marches still have problems, they still struggle with accessibility and inclusion; be they too white, or not disability friendly. A number of Pride March’s last year had their message co-opted by TERF groups. There have been arguments about the inclusion of organisations like the police or government departments in Pride events in some cities this year, with the concern that having people in uniforms as part of Pride will put some members of the community off attending.

Pride Flag

I have only been out as Queer for a couple of years now, and as a Cis, white woman with a son I could be seen to have ‘passing privilege’, in that people make assumptions about my sexuality. But I have to deal with the typical invisibility that most Bisexual or Queer people face, especially those who have children, in that assumption that your sexuality is based on who you are currently dating. However, in the grand scheme of things I’m well aware I have been very lucky, as I have never had to face the discrimination or abuse that others have had. Nor have I ever had to deal with any overt problems from my family, friends or colleagues when I came out. I resisted coming out for a long time because of hearing comments about Bisexual people’s presumed promiscuity or ‘inability to choose’, but actually when I worked up the courage to finally come out, those around me were very supportive; and I appreciate how privileged that makes me.

Recently I have been trying to be both a more vocal ally and a more visible member of the LGBTQ* community. The LGBTQ* networks in the public sector that I have found have all been very welcoming. While there is definitely more that needs to be done in terms of awareness and providing support for those members of the community who are facing bullying, harassment or discrimination, things like the cross government LGBT community event last year which was jointly sponsored by #OneTeamGov and DWP was really lovely to be part of, and the cross government #OneTeamGov LGBT+ slack group is a fantastic safe space for members of the community to discuss issues and upcoming events.

I asked on Twitter and the Slack channel for some examples of lanyards from the LGBTQ* networks from across the Public Sector using the #ShowUsYourLanyard.

Left to Right: Care Quality Commission; Prison & Probation Service; a:Gender; Ministry of Justice; The Insolvency Service; Department of Heath & Social Care; and Departments for Works and Pensions.

As @HMPPS_PIPP says, lanyards are a way to show our everyday commitment and support for our community, a way to make a small gesture, but have a massive impact.

This year as some parts of the world begin to look more frightening, and with politics moving more to the right in many places I feel that I need to stand up and be counted now more than ever, to support those around me who can not come out and live there life in the open, to be an ally to those in our community who do face discrimination or attacks regularly.

This is doubly true as a Leader, I am trying my hardest to be an visible queer person within the Public Sector, while still be authentic and myself. Talking to others in the community about their issues, and working with networks to identify things we could do better, or seek opportunities to join up with others. This isn’t always the easiest thing to do, trying to find the time to attend network meetings or attend events isn’t easy for any of us, and I’m well aware it’s something I could do better at. This year I feel like I’m letting myself and my community down because I’m struggling to attend my local Pride march.

So, as we here the debate for ‘straight pride’ rear is head again as it did every month; I’m reminding myself why Pride is important, not just for myself, but for others in the community; and a quick look on social media reminds me that I am not taking this stance alone.

While there might still be plenty of people who disapprove of us, who hate us, who want to deny our rights to love who we love, and be who we are; that isn’t true of everyone. As I wrote this blog my news alert pinged with the news that Botswana has decriminalized gay sex. Taiwan legalised gay marriage last month, and in Poland were there are fears of its ruling Conservative government party rolling back LGBTQ* rights, Warsaw had its biggest Pride March yet with it’s mayor in attendance.

So if you are reading this and facing discrimination, please know you are not alone either. We are all here with you. That for me is what Pride month is all about, standing together, supporting each other and letting the world know we are not going anywhere. We matter. You matter. Whether you are out or not, whether you can attend Pride or not ; I am proud of you.

What does good Leadership look like to me?

Over the last 6 months or so I’ve been percolating on what good leadership looks like, at least to me, and how I can make sure I am acting like the good leader I would want to see.

There’s been lots of good thought pieces and conversations happening about good leadership over the last year or so. Kit Collingwood’s blog on Empathetic Leadership in the civil service being one, and there was a #OneTeamGov workshop a few months ago where we discussed what makes a good leader, so I know I’m not alone in considering the subject.

For me there are a number of traits I look for when I consider whether someone is a good leader, and on a personal level, could I work for them?

Empathy is the fist, given the field I work in, empathy is key. We have to try and understand the experiences of the users of our services, be able to recognise our privilege and still empathise with people who’s experiences are different than our own.

Active Listening is the second, I’ve encountered a number of leaders over the years who do a good job of acting like they are listening, but as soon as they have left the room that conversation is forgotten. Their opinions seem to change with the wind depending on who they have talked to last. The ability as a leader to actively listen, to try and understand what is being said and why, is fundamental in being a good leader.

Approachable, for me Leaders have to be approachable, I have to be able to discuss things with them, come to them with concerns and ideas.

Authentic, I find it much easier to respect people when I can trust that they mean what they say, that they are being themselves.

Personable. A lot of things discussing leadership talk about charisma, charismatic leaders etc. The cult of personality. I’d rather work for a decent human that I can relate to or get along with rather than a charismatic figure.

Encouraging. They empower those around them. They encourage them to try things. The support them to develop and grow. They trust their people. They make them feel valued.

And on a personal level, what does good leadership mean for me?

It means I can be myself.

It means I feel empowered and trusted

It means I feel listened to and heard

It means I’m more able to just get on and deliver, rather than cover my back in paper trails.

It means I’m more likely to actively enjoy my job and deliver good things.

It means I understand my value, and feel appreciated, I understand my purpose and what I can deliver.

It means I feel safe to innovate and take risks

So how do I try to model those behaviours?

I don’t ask for more from anyone than I’m willing to give, I try to set a good example, whether that’s working the right hours, recognising when people have gone above and beyond and celebrating not only success but effort.

I encourage those around me to get on and do things without waiting for my sign off, as long as they have the data or evidence to back up their decisions I make sure they know I will back them. We are all on a journey to discover and grow; it’s important to take risks sometimes when there are things we can learn.

I try to be approachable and human. I talk about my mental health. My family. I may not share with my work colleagues everything, but nor do I put up a wall or plaster on false face. I talk to people. I value the people around me and try to recognise that everyone can have bad days as well as good ones. Equally I recognise that sometimes my role as a leader is to shoulder more of that burden, to protect my teams; but rarely is that any one persons alone; knowing who you can call on for support is an essential part of being human.

I try to be transparent and honest. I admit when I know things I’m not yet able to share. I admit when things are hard. I appreciate that we all have to sometimes do things we don’t want to, that is life, and sometimes we struggle with things, we are all human.

I try to be adaptable. I accept that not everyone is the same and try to understand the needs of those around me, my staff and my teams.

I am always trying to learn from my experiences and my mistakes and perhaps most importantly I admit when I’ve got things wrong and apologise. I am always learning and growing as a leader and a person.

Reaching out.

A blog for #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek 2019

It’s mental health awareness week, and I’ve seen lots of things about “I’m always here, reach out to me if you need help”, or “show you care, support those around you by reaching out to them and seeing how they are doing”.

And I wholeheartedly love both these sentiments. We should be talking about mental health more and more. As a society we’re having more conversation about what we can do to support each other and be kind to ourselves, and it’s great.

My problem is the thought of reaching out to anyone, to say I need help, or to offer support, fills me with dread.

I’ve talked before on social media about my Imposter Syndrome and social anxiety, and Gavin Elliot does one of the best blogs out there about what Imposter syndrome is. It makes you feel like you add no worth. So reaching out to ask for help, or offering help to others, is very very hard to do, because it is imposing on others time. Butting into their life uninvited. Interrupting them. Giving them the opportunity to see you.

I’ve been told in the past people don’t assume I ever need help because I seem confident. That I can seem imposing to approach. Yet I always try to help other when I am approached, I will share what’s going on in my life and the things that are bothering me if I am asked about them.

But the ability to reach out first? To drop someone a message out of the blue? On a bad day I can find that simple act almost impossible.

That fear is something over the years I’ve worked hard to overcome, and I will now try and force myself to reach out, both to ask for help, and to ask if I can help without waiting to be given a direct opening. But even on the best day, it still takes effort for me to do so, it is not natural for me.

It’s something I oddly find a little easier in a professional setting, as I know what my role is and my responsibilities within that, but outside of that scope then it becomes much harder for me to reach out first.

And the thing is, even when you’re doing well, and have been doing well for a while, it’s easy for your confidence to take a hit, and for you to take a backwards step. For things you thought you had overcome to rear their head. 

And that is ok.

There will be times when you’re doing well and can do the things you find hard. And times when your can’t.

However you manage your mental health, the first step is knowing yourself, knowing what you find hard and what things can set you back, owning that knowledge. But its also important to recognise the things that can help you do the things you find hard. That good days and bad days exist.

And I just want to say I hear you. I’m here should you ever want to talk. Whether you can reach or to me or not, I want you to know you are not alone.

If you’re struggling with your mental health, Mind can be a good place to start if you need some help.