×

Tag: pride

Having pride in our diversity and learning to be inclusive

June is Pride Month when members of the LGBTQ+ community and their allies come together in different ways to celebrate, remember and reflect. As such, now June is over, I wanted to reflect on the things I learnt this year.

Pride and Trans Pride Flags.

This June was a Pride Month like no over, because of COVID-19; lockdown meant that the usual pride marches were cancelled and then moved online.

June was also the month that #BlackLivesMatter came to the forefront of Western consensus because of unforgivable killing of George Floyd in the US, amongst sadly so many others around the globe. With marches and rallies both in the US and UK (and elsewhere) to call for the end of police brutality and discrimination against Black people.

And finally, June (yep, still Pride Month) was when JKR yet again decided to use her platform to gatekeep women’s spaces and to decry the acceptance of trans women as women. (I’m not linking to her article, because I won’t give it airspace, but there are MANY fantastic pieces that explain why this stance is harmful, here’s just one. But the Tl:Dr version is, Trans Women are Women.)

As such, this month, more than any other June that we have seen in a long time, has been one in which the conversations about diversity and inclusion have been so important.

I was asked this month, why diversity and inclusion were important to me?

As the very wise Fareeha Usman, founder of Being women, said “Discrimination can only be tackled if we first tackle our own insecurities.”

Working within and alongside the public sector, we develop policies, products and services for the public; for citizens, for society. We can not develop things for people, if we can not empathise with them; if we can not understand where they are coming from and the problems/ barriers they are facing. The people we are building form come from diverse backgrounds. If our teams all look and sound the same, and have the same life experiences, then we will never be able to deliver things that meet the diverse needs of our users.

Lots of hands coming together with a heart over the top

The Lesbians who tech (and allies) held their annual pride summit from the 22nd to 26th of June, and this year there was a clear focus on #BlackLivesMatter and also #TransWomenAreWomen as well; with a whole host of fantastic speakers discussing actions we can all take to be more inclusive. I was also lucky enough to be asked to speak at a D&I panel* on the 24th held by @SR2 and had the opportunity to attend the Dynamo North East event on the 25th, and to attend several other virtual pride events.

Key things I learned:

  • Locational geo-clusters can be a blocker to diversity and reinforce racial discrimination – @LorraineBardeen
  • When attending a meeting/ workshop or invited to sit on a panel, it’s our responsibility to check who else is ‘in the room’ and see if we are needed there, or is there someone else from a different group who’s voice needs amplifying more than ours. – @JasmineMcElry
  • When awarding contracts we need to look at companies track record on diversity / pay etc. And make sure we are not unconsciously biased against companies that have a makes up that does not match our own. – @SenatorElizabethWarren
  • It is our job to educate ourselves and not ask anyone else to educate us; as leaders our role is to admit we don’t know everything, that we are still learning, and to actively listen to others – @TiffanyDawnson

COVID-19, if nothing else, has given us the opportunity to think about the society we want to see coming out of this pandemic. We have all embraced things like remote working to help us keep working, now is the time to consider whether these tools can also help us going forward to be more inclusive in our workforce, and our society.

Removing the dependance on geographical hiring would enable us to include people from wider ethnic communities, as well as disabled people who have often found themselves excluded from office jobs by the commute etc; or people with caring responsibilities for who the standard 9-5 office job doesn’t work.

A fantastic session led by Nic Palmarini, Director of NICA, on Agism stated that “We need to reimagine a new society that is more inclusive”. This for me sums up the conversations I have seen, heard and been lucky enough to be part of this month; and I am proud to be part of a company, an industry and a community, that is trying its hardest to do just that.

Difrent's Diversity stats
The Diversity stats from Difrent

*If you fancy catching up on the panel, details are here: https://zoom.us/rec/share/7uV5L-rezkhIZZXT8FjFVKQIAZTCeaa82yJI-Pdby0whYlngi4VRx3mii2Gvb-zR Password: 1H+a15=#

Why am I going to be flying my Pride flag extra high this Pride Month

Looking round the news over the last 12 months and you could be mistaken for thinking in some places we’re back in the 80’s if not earlier.

This week has brought news of Nazi’s attending Pride marches in America, Russia has been rolling back LGBTQ* rights for over a year now. In the UK there have been protests and debates about the inclusion of LGBTQ* relationships within Primary School education. There are still multiple places in the world where it’s not safe for LGBTQ* individuals to live or travel, never mind be able to marry or adopt.

With Japan ruling that Trans people must be sterilized, Brunei introducing the death penalty for homosexuality (but saying it won’t enforce it after a public outcry), America re-banning Trans in the military and the hot topic of Trans peoples place in sports and bathrooms it has felt very much like our Trans friends and family especially have been bearing the brunt of a lot of unwanted attention.

Trans Flag

I know there are many people, both in this country, and all over the world who can not be out. Who have to hide a part of themselves and remain in the closet. Pride marches still have problems, they still struggle with accessibility and inclusion; be they too white, or not disability friendly. A number of Pride March’s last year had their message co-opted by TERF groups. There have been arguments about the inclusion of organisations like the police or government departments in Pride events in some cities this year, with the concern that having people in uniforms as part of Pride will put some members of the community off attending.

Pride Flag

I have only been out as Queer for a couple of years now, and as a Cis, white woman with a son I could be seen to have ‘passing privilege’, in that people make assumptions about my sexuality. But I have to deal with the typical invisibility that most Bisexual or Queer people face, especially those who have children, in that assumption that your sexuality is based on who you are currently dating. However, in the grand scheme of things I’m well aware I have been very lucky, as I have never had to face the discrimination or abuse that others have had. Nor have I ever had to deal with any overt problems from my family, friends or colleagues when I came out. I resisted coming out for a long time because of hearing comments about Bisexual people’s presumed promiscuity or ‘inability to choose’, but actually when I worked up the courage to finally come out, those around me were very supportive; and I appreciate how privileged that makes me.

Recently I have been trying to be both a more vocal ally and a more visible member of the LGBTQ* community. The LGBTQ* networks in the public sector that I have found have all been very welcoming. While there is definitely more that needs to be done in terms of awareness and providing support for those members of the community who are facing bullying, harassment or discrimination, things like the cross government LGBT community event last year which was jointly sponsored by #OneTeamGov and DWP was really lovely to be part of, and the cross government #OneTeamGov LGBT+ slack group is a fantastic safe space for members of the community to discuss issues and upcoming events.

I asked on Twitter and the Slack channel for some examples of lanyards from the LGBTQ* networks from across the Public Sector using the #ShowUsYourLanyard.

Left to Right: Care Quality Commission; Prison & Probation Service; a:Gender; Ministry of Justice; The Insolvency Service; Department of Heath & Social Care; and Departments for Works and Pensions.

As @HMPPS_PIPP says, lanyards are a way to show our everyday commitment and support for our community, a way to make a small gesture, but have a massive impact.

This year as some parts of the world begin to look more frightening, and with politics moving more to the right in many places I feel that I need to stand up and be counted now more than ever, to support those around me who can not come out and live there life in the open, to be an ally to those in our community who do face discrimination or attacks regularly.

This is doubly true as a Leader, I am trying my hardest to be an visible queer person within the Public Sector, while still be authentic and myself. Talking to others in the community about their issues, and working with networks to identify things we could do better, or seek opportunities to join up with others. This isn’t always the easiest thing to do, trying to find the time to attend network meetings or attend events isn’t easy for any of us, and I’m well aware it’s something I could do better at. This year I feel like I’m letting myself and my community down because I’m struggling to attend my local Pride march.

So, as we here the debate for ‘straight pride’ rear is head again as it did every month; I’m reminding myself why Pride is important, not just for myself, but for others in the community; and a quick look on social media reminds me that I am not taking this stance alone.

While there might still be plenty of people who disapprove of us, who hate us, who want to deny our rights to love who we love, and be who we are; that isn’t true of everyone. As I wrote this blog my news alert pinged with the news that Botswana has decriminalized gay sex. Taiwan legalised gay marriage last month, and in Poland were there are fears of its ruling Conservative government party rolling back LGBTQ* rights, Warsaw had its biggest Pride March yet with it’s mayor in attendance.

So if you are reading this and facing discrimination, please know you are not alone either. We are all here with you. That for me is what Pride month is all about, standing together, supporting each other and letting the world know we are not going anywhere. We matter. You matter. Whether you are out or not, whether you can attend Pride or not ; I am proud of you.