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Tag: lgbt

Somewhere under the Double Rainbow – Discussing LGBTQIA+ & Neurodiversity Intersectionality 

An infinity symbol in rainbow colours
The rainbow infinity symbol – sometimes used to identify the ‘NeuroQueer’ community

As a queer woman with ADHD, the subject of intersectionality is one I’ve always been interested in.

There have been numerous discussions and studies about the links between people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Gender Dysphoria; with the theory being that there are many Trans/ gender-diverse folks who have ASD; perhaps because (in the words of an acquaintance of mine) “folks with ASD are less likely to just accept societal gender rules without questioning them when they make no logical sense”. This sentiment certainly seems to be backed up by the data; with one study of 641,860 people finding that “about 5%, of the cisgender people in the study had autism, whereas 24% of the gender-diverse people were also Autistic.

I’m Cis and I don’t have ASD; so I’m in no way qualified to comment on any possible links; and why or why not they might exist; and I will leave that conversation to people who are far more informed than I. However, what I can comment on; at least from my looking around my own friendship group and social media; is that there does seem to be a significant overlap between LGBTQIA+ folks and those who are neurodivergent of some flavour or other (although sadly there’s no specific data on this subject). 

3% of people in the UK identify as LGBTQIA+ (according to the ONS; but it’s acknowledged it’s likely to be closer to 10% as underreporting is still an issue due to the amount of stigma that still exists) but let’s just say 3% for now; and 15% of the UK population is estimated to be neurodiverse. There is evidence to suggest that neurodiverse people are more likely to be gender diverse and/or identify as lesbian, gay, queer, or asexual themselves, compared to neurotypical people. One study in 2008 found that more adults with ADHD identified themselves as bisexual compared to individuals without ADHD. Again, the predominate theory as to why more neurodivergent people identify as LGBTQAI+ is that “if you are positioned to question “norms” than you are automatically more willing to embrace a non-conforming gender identity or sexuality.”

Ok, more neurodivergent people identify as LGBTQIA+, so what? 

Well firstly; it’s important to recognise that there are lots of parallels between the experiences of neurodivergent people and LGBTQIA+ people; with some neurodivergent folks describing having to ‘come out‘ at work or to friends/family as neurodivergent; in the same way LGBTQIA+ folks have to ‘come out’ about their sexuality. Interestingly I found it much harder and got much more backlash from my parents when I told them I had ADHD than I did when I told them I was Queer. 

Being Neurodiverse, like being LGBTQIA+, also still comes with a lot of stigma; and both neurodiverse and LGBTQAI+ folks still face a lot of discrimination. There are ‘charities’ and organisations out there dedicated to finding a ‘cure’ for folks with ASD just like there are for ‘curing’ or finding the ‘cause’ of being Queer; with conversation therapy being a harmful ‘tool’ used against both neurodiverse and LGBTQIA+ people in an attempt to ‘normalise’ them.  

Secondly, it’s important to recognise that because of the above; folks who are both neurodivergent and Queer (I’ve seen this referred to in some circles as being NeuroQueer) can face double the amount of prejudice, discrimination and hurdles to overcome. As the Equality Network explains; “having an intersectional identity often generates a feeling that someone does not completely belong in one group or another, and can lead to isolation, depression and other mental health issues.” 

Many LGBT-focused organisations sadly have little knowledge of, for example, disability or race issues, which can lead to people feeling excluded or shut out of the community. In 2019 Brighton Pride faced accusations of running an inaccessibly pride event, with disabled LGBTQIA+ folks feeling excluded from attending; and they weren’t the only one facing this accusation. This has led to an increasing number of conversations happening recently about how to make Pride events inclusive to people with disabilities. 

Recognising the importance of intersectional inclusivity, “several organisations and groups in the UK have been set up to specifically cater to Queer disabled people’s needs, like Brownton Abbey, “where queer, black and brown disabled folks reign supreme”, ParaPride, who work with venues to improve accessibility, and LGBTQ+ Disabled Queer and Hear.” 

But this isn’t just something that LGBTQIA+ or Neurodiversity focused organisations need to consider; it’s also equally important for every businesses to recognise the importance of inclusivity and intersectionality when they are considering how they support their staff; or develop services for people to use. As an example, addressing issues that may affect the recruitment or retention or promotion of LGBTQIA+ folks in a way that’s not inclusive of neurodiverse people will likely not have the impact you’re hoping for; and vice versa. Sadly, only 1 in 10% organisations in the UK take neurodiversity into consideration as part of their people management procesess; and this lack of support is likely to impact Queer staff more.

As it’s Pride Month, and many organisations are considering how they support LGBTQIA+ folks better; it’s extremely important that we focus on creating inclusive environments that respect every part of people’s identity rather than focusing on singular elements of it. 

A brain in rainbow colours
A rainbow brain

(Race is another important area of intersectionality that I haven’t touched on in this blog; as a white person I’m really not qualified to comment on that so, I won’t touch on that here and will instead provide some links below and defer that topic to those with more lived experience and knowledge of the issues that need addressing.) 

Other useful links:

Why am I going to be flying my Pride flag extra high this Pride Month

Looking round the news over the last 12 months and you could be mistaken for thinking in some places we’re back in the 80’s if not earlier.

This week has brought news of Nazi’s attending Pride marches in America, Russia has been rolling back LGBTQ* rights for over a year now. In the UK there have been protests and debates about the inclusion of LGBTQ* relationships within Primary School education. There are still multiple places in the world where it’s not safe for LGBTQ* individuals to live or travel, never mind be able to marry or adopt.

With Japan ruling that Trans people must be sterilized, Brunei introducing the death penalty for homosexuality (but saying it won’t enforce it after a public outcry), America re-banning Trans in the military and the hot topic of Trans peoples place in sports and bathrooms it has felt very much like our Trans friends and family especially have been bearing the brunt of a lot of unwanted attention.

Trans Flag

I know there are many people, both in this country, and all over the world who can not be out. Who have to hide a part of themselves and remain in the closet. Pride marches still have problems, they still struggle with accessibility and inclusion; be they too white, or not disability friendly. A number of Pride March’s last year had their message co-opted by TERF groups. There have been arguments about the inclusion of organisations like the police or government departments in Pride events in some cities this year, with the concern that having people in uniforms as part of Pride will put some members of the community off attending.

Pride Flag

I have only been out as Queer for a couple of years now, and as a Cis, white woman with a son I could be seen to have ‘passing privilege’, in that people make assumptions about my sexuality. But I have to deal with the typical invisibility that most Bisexual or Queer people face, especially those who have children, in that assumption that your sexuality is based on who you are currently dating. However, in the grand scheme of things I’m well aware I have been very lucky, as I have never had to face the discrimination or abuse that others have had. Nor have I ever had to deal with any overt problems from my family, friends or colleagues when I came out. I resisted coming out for a long time because of hearing comments about Bisexual people’s presumed promiscuity or ‘inability to choose’, but actually when I worked up the courage to finally come out, those around me were very supportive; and I appreciate how privileged that makes me.

Recently I have been trying to be both a more vocal ally and a more visible member of the LGBTQ* community. The LGBTQ* networks in the public sector that I have found have all been very welcoming. While there is definitely more that needs to be done in terms of awareness and providing support for those members of the community who are facing bullying, harassment or discrimination, things like the cross government LGBT community event last year which was jointly sponsored by #OneTeamGov and DWP was really lovely to be part of, and the cross government #OneTeamGov LGBT+ slack group is a fantastic safe space for members of the community to discuss issues and upcoming events.

I asked on Twitter and the Slack channel for some examples of lanyards from the LGBTQ* networks from across the Public Sector using the #ShowUsYourLanyard.

Left to Right: Care Quality Commission; Prison & Probation Service; a:Gender; Ministry of Justice; The Insolvency Service; Department of Heath & Social Care; and Departments for Works and Pensions.

As @HMPPS_PIPP says, lanyards are a way to show our everyday commitment and support for our community, a way to make a small gesture, but have a massive impact.

This year as some parts of the world begin to look more frightening, and with politics moving more to the right in many places I feel that I need to stand up and be counted now more than ever, to support those around me who can not come out and live there life in the open, to be an ally to those in our community who do face discrimination or attacks regularly.

This is doubly true as a Leader, I am trying my hardest to be an visible queer person within the Public Sector, while still be authentic and myself. Talking to others in the community about their issues, and working with networks to identify things we could do better, or seek opportunities to join up with others. This isn’t always the easiest thing to do, trying to find the time to attend network meetings or attend events isn’t easy for any of us, and I’m well aware it’s something I could do better at. This year I feel like I’m letting myself and my community down because I’m struggling to attend my local Pride march.

So, as we here the debate for ‘straight pride’ rear is head again as it did every month; I’m reminding myself why Pride is important, not just for myself, but for others in the community; and a quick look on social media reminds me that I am not taking this stance alone.

While there might still be plenty of people who disapprove of us, who hate us, who want to deny our rights to love who we love, and be who we are; that isn’t true of everyone. As I wrote this blog my news alert pinged with the news that Botswana has decriminalized gay sex. Taiwan legalised gay marriage last month, and in Poland were there are fears of its ruling Conservative government party rolling back LGBTQ* rights, Warsaw had its biggest Pride March yet with it’s mayor in attendance.

So if you are reading this and facing discrimination, please know you are not alone either. We are all here with you. That for me is what Pride month is all about, standing together, supporting each other and letting the world know we are not going anywhere. We matter. You matter. Whether you are out or not, whether you can attend Pride or not ; I am proud of you.